Cloud · Havana · IceHouse · Instance Management · Juno · Kilo · Liberty · Network Management · Neutron · OpenStack

Getting started with first instance on OpenStack

Once OpenStack is installed, we need to do a certain steps before we start the instance for the first time.
Continue reading “Getting started with first instance on OpenStack”

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Cloud · Glance · Liberty · Neutron · Open vSwitch · OpenStack · OpenStack installation guide · Ubuntu · Ubuntu 14.04

OpenStack Liberty on Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubuntu 15.10 – Single machine setup

Install Ubuntu with partitioning scheme as per your requirements. Note: Run all the commands as super-user. We assume that the IP of the Single machine is 10.0.0.1. Continue reading “OpenStack Liberty on Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubuntu 15.10 – Single machine setup”

Cloud · Glance · IceHouse · Image Management · Image Service · Instance Management · Keystone · Network Management · Neutron · Open vSwitch · OpenStack · OpenStack architecture · OpenStack installation guide

OpenStack Beginner’s Guide – For Ubuntu Trusty

Version 4 of OpenStack Beginner’s Guide is out. This guide is based on OpenStack Icehouse version. You can download the book by clicking the link below.

Click on the image to download the guide.
Click on the image to download the guide.
Cloud · Grizzly · Havana · IceHouse · Netfilter · Netlink · Network Management · Networking · Neutron · Open source · Open vSwitch · OpenFlow · OpenStack · OpenStack architecture · Quantum · Software Defined Networking · Virtualization

L3 connectivity using neutron-l3-agent

The neutron l3 agent is responsible for providing service for routing, natting, security-group rules and floatingip allocation. This purpose of this post is to document its working principles and also to enable users to effectively debug their Openstack cloud(most problems occur due to user mis configuration). The l3 agent offers these services from the network node and relies on neutron-openvswitch-agent to provide l2 connectivity to the instances running on compute nodes. This post assumes that the readers are aware of how l2 connectivity is achieved using ‘openvswitch’ mechanism driver. Continue reading “L3 connectivity using neutron-l3-agent”

Cloud · Linux Distribution · LXC · Netfilter · Netlink · Network Management · Networking · Open source · Open vSwitch · OpenFlow · OpenStack · Virtualization

A bite of virtual linux networking

In this post we shall be discussing about various network components and their corresponding Linux virtual counterparts.

Bridges

Switches basically provide the following functionality

  1. Mac learning: As switch receive packets on their interface they map the interface id/port number to the source mac address of the all packets received on that interface. This is used later while forwarding.
  2. Forwarding: Switches do not see a packet past the l2 headers. The have to perform a simple logic before sending out a packet received on one interface, to other interfaces.
    1. If the destination is broadcast/multi-cast, forward on all ports except the ingress port.
    2. If the destination of a packet is mapped to any interface send the packet out that interface alone.
    3. If the destination is non of the above, forward on all ports belonging to the packet’s VLAN, except the ingress port.
  3. VLAN Isolation: Packets are assorted according to their VLAN. A switch’s port can be either configured as trunk port(Belongs to all VLANs) or as an access port for a particular VLAN. The rules therefore are simple.
    1. Packets appearing on trunk ports should be tagged unless they belong to vlan 1(native vlan). The tag identifies the packet’s vlan in this case.
    2. Packets appearing on access ports should not be tagged unless they want to be dropped. The port configuration(access ports always belong to a VLAN) identifies the packet in this case

    The assorted packets then pass through the forwarding phase, which determine to which port they would be sent to. Packets going out trunk ports will be tagged and those going out access ports will not be tagged. The forwarding logic guarantees that a packet belonging to a VLAN shall never trespass another VLAN.

Continue reading “A bite of virtual linux networking”